Yellow violets. They come in white too.

 

Dutchman’s Breeches  (This blog editor’s favorite)

 

Red trillium classic. Photo credit: Tom Silva

 

A red trillium struggling to unfurl.

 

Coltsfoot is an alien plant, the first wildflower to bloom in spring – but not in the sugarbush. This photo was taken near the sap shed. Coltsfoot grows in waste places and on roadsides. The flower blooms before the leaves come out. It’s the big green leaves that give the plant its name.

 

Spring Peeper on Porch. “Otter the cat is bugging me.” Photo credit: Tom Silva

 

How many white pails does it take to make a gallon of maple syrup?  Study this photo for 15 seconds, leave to get a glass of water in the kitchen, then close your eyes and name 10 items from the photo.

 

 

5 thoughts on “Ephemerals Fest

  1. I have spring beauties in my yard (well, not on the lawn, but in the woods edges) for the first time ever! What do we think that means? Alison.

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    1. Alison, That’s so interesting. I asked Lew and he thinks you are being blessed. (Possibly there has been a subtle change in the balance of light and shade or in the soil.) AC

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  2. I saw dutchman’s breeches in the woods in Calais earlier this week. My guide book also called that flower wild bleeding heart. Do you know if they are the same?

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    1. Nina, We haven’t heard it called wild bleeding heart but it makes sense. Peterson’s Field Guide lists it as DUTCHMAN’S-BREECHES (Dicentra cucullaria)
      Poppy Family (Papaveraceae)
      Bleeding-Heart Subfamily (Fumarioideae)
      In the guide book New England’s Mountain Flowers, dutchman’s breeches are shown alongside Dicentra canadensis (squirrel corn) which appears to have a more distinctive heart shape. “Each Dicentra blossom is composed of two pairs of petals—each member of the pair having a different shape from the other. The result is a number of unusual forms: breeches, bleeding hearts, ear drops, and even a steer’s skull.”

      I haven’t seen dutchman’s breeches that bleed pink, but apparently some of them do. Thanks for nudging me to pull the guide books off the shelf. AC

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